Data explorer

CWE: A Deep Dive into the World of Cyber Vulnerabilities

CWE, OWASP And OWASP top 10 are powered by data. Empower application security and fuel up your application security program with the power of data visualization and threat intelligence. Phoenix Security brings a data-driven and risk-based approach to application security. The Phoenix security intelligence enables a data-driven and risk-based approach on application security programs. We present in this section the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) a tool for identifying and mitigating software vulnerabilities. Beyond that, we harness threat intelligence to stay ahead of emerging risks. Join us on this journey to safeguard your digital assets and thrive in the ever-evolving digital landscape. Accelerate your application security and vulnerability management with a deep understanding of CWE.

What is CWE?

The Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) is a community-driven project that maintains a publicly available, extensive list of common software and hardware security weaknesses or vulnerabilities.

The Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) is a community-driven project that maintains a publicly available, extensive list of common software and hardware security weaknesses or vulnerabilities. CWE provides a standardized way to identify, describe, and categorize these weaknesses, making it easier for security professionals, developers, and organizations to understand, address, and mitigate security issues in software and hardware systems a fundamental part of your application and vulnerability management program. 

CWE is not a list of specific vulnerabilities but rather a taxonomy or framework that classifies weaknesses into different categories based on their characteristics and behaviors. Each entry in the database includes a unique identifier, a detailed description of the weakness, information about its potential impact, and often includes guidance on how to prevent or mitigate it.

Security experts and organizations use CWE as a reference to improve the security of their software development and testing processes. It is often used in conjunction with other security resources, such as the OWASP Top 10, to better understand and address security vulnerabilities in applications and systems.

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Application Security Programs: How to combine CWE and Threat intelligence

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Understanding differences between CWE and CVE:

CWE and CVE play distinct yet complementary roles in the field of cybersecurity. Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) is a structured framework that identifies and categorizes software weaknesses and vulnerabilities. It provides a comprehensive taxonomy of common security issues, making it easier for professionals to understand and mitigate vulnerabilities during the development process. In contrast, Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) is a system that assigns unique identifiers to specific security vulnerabilities found in software or hardware. CVEs are like individual markers that help security practitioners track and reference specific security flaws. While CWE focuses on classifying the types of weaknesses, CVEs are concerned with uniquely identifying and documenting vulnerabilities in specific products and versions. CWE and CVE form a powerful duo, aiding in understanding, assessing, and managing security risks in the ever-evolving digital landscape. Understanding this data can be pivotal to enhancing your vulnerability management program and application security program. 

Analyzing CWE Through Data Visualization:

In the ever-evolving digital landscape, cybersecurity remains a pivotal concern, and understanding vulnerabilities is paramount.

 Enter the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE), a robust framework designed to tackle these vulnerabilities head-on. In this comprehensive guide, we’ll delve into the realm of CWE, exploring its significance, characteristics, and how it empowers individuals and organizations to fortify their digital assets. Understanding the data and insights as well as patterns over the years helps shape your application security program and vulnerability management.

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Explore CWE Trends 2023

CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) and CISA KEV (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Key Executive Vital Information Program) are linked through their shared mission of enhancing cybersecurity resilience. CWE offers a comprehensive framework for identifying and categorizing software vulnerabilities and weaknesses, serving as a foundational resource for understanding security risks. CISA KEV, on the other hand, focuses on providing key executives with critical cybersecurity information. The relationship between these two lies in the mapping of CWE entries to vulnerabilities that may impact the vital information and security of key executives. This mapping ensures that CISA KEV participants have access to vital insights about software weaknesses that could pose significant security risks, allowing for informed decision-making and proactive mitigation strategies. Together, CWE and CISA KEV strengthen an organization's cybersecurity posture, safeguarding essential information and resources.

CWE Data explorer

Over the years, the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) has evolved into a vital resource in the field of cybersecurity. It has continually expanded to include a comprehensive list of software vulnerabilities and weaknesses, providing detailed descriptions and categorizations. Understanding the patterns over the years helps shaping your application security program and vulnerability management.One of its significant milestones is the introduction of the CWE Top 25, a curated list of the most prevalent and dangerous software weaknesses, designed to help organizations prioritize their security efforts. The CWE Top 25 serves as a beacon, highlighting the critical vulnerabilities that pose the most substantial threats, enabling security professionals to focus on addressing these high-priority issues to bolster their overall cybersecurity defenses effectively.

Application of CWE

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What is CWE used for:

CWE serves a pivotal role in the cyber landscape, offering a categorized collection of known weaknesses, helping software developers, security practitioners, and even hardware vendors identify, mitigate, and prevent vulnerabilities for your application and vulnerability management program. 

CWE and OWASP

CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) and OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project) share a symbiotic relationship in the realm of cybersecurity. CWE provides a standardized framework for identifying and categorizing software vulnerabilities and weaknesses, offering a comprehensive taxonomy. OWASP, on the other hand, focuses on web application security and curates the OWASP Top 10, a list of the most critical web application security risks. These two entities are mapped together when the vulnerabilities outlined in the OWASP Top 10 are categorized using CWE entries. This mapping connects the specific vulnerabilities highlighted by OWASP to the broader CWE framework, facilitating a deeper understanding and more effective mitigation of security risks in web applications. It's a synergy that empowers cybersecurity professionals to fortify digital assets comprehensively.

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An example of use:

An illustrative example of a CWE is "CWE-79: Improper Neutralization of Input During Web Page Generation", more commonly known as Cross-site Scripting or XSS. This weakness refers to a software's inability to properly sanitize user inputs, potentially allowing hackers to run malicious scripts.

CWE and CISA/ Kev

CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) and CISA KEV (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Key Executive Vital Information Program) are linked through their shared mission of enhancing cybersecurity resilience. CWE offers a comprehensive framework for identifying and categorizing software vulnerabilities and weaknesses, serving as a foundational resource for understanding security risks. CISA KEV, on the other hand, focuses on providing key executives with critical cybersecurity information. The relationship between these two lies in the mapping of CWE entries to vulnerabilities that may impact the vital information and security of key executives. This mapping ensures that CISA KEV participants have access to vital insights about software weaknesses that could pose significant security risks, allowing for informed decision-making and proactive mitigation strategies. Together, CWE and CISA KEV strengthen an organization's cybersecurity posture, safeguarding essential information and resources.

Data Visualization over various dataset:

We analyse the presence of CWE in various datasets like National Vulnerability database (NVD), Cisa KEV (cisa Known Explooitable vulnerabilities, Bug bounties programs and more

CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) has been used across the year and is a comprehensive framework that categorizes software vulnerabilities. It maps seamlessly to other formats and significantly impacts attack methodologies. In vulnerability management and application security, understanding CWE is vital. It forms the basis for mitigations, aligning with OWASP’s Top 10 and the Phoenix Security Exploitability framework, ensuring robust protection strategies.

CWE Across Datasets OWASP, Exploitability
 

CWE and CISA KEV

CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) and CISA KEV (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Key Executive Vital Information Program) are linked through their shared mission of enhancing cybersecurity resilience. The application of intelligence can help in your application security program and vulnerability management. CWE offers a comprehensive framework for identifying and categorizing software vulnerabilities and weaknesses, serving as a foundational resource for understanding security risks. CISA KEV, on the other hand, focuses on providing key executives with critical cybersecurity information. The relationship between these two lies in the mapping of CWE entries to vulnerabilities that may impact the vital information and security of key executives. This mapping ensures that CISA KEV participants have access to vital insights about software weaknesses that could pose significant security risks, allowing for informed decision-making and proactive mitigation strategies.

CWE and OWASP

The mapping between OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project) and CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) is a crucial link in the realm of web application security. OWASP, with its OWASP Top 10, highlights the most critical web application security risks, providing a practical guide for developers and security professionals. These risks often encompass various software vulnerabilities and weaknesses, which can be categorized using CWE entries. This mapping process connects the specific security risks emphasized by OWASP to the broader CWE framework, allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the underlying software vulnerabilities and their mitigations. It enables cybersecurity experts to bridge the gap between practical security concerns, as identified by OWASP, and the foundational knowledge of software weaknesses provided ultimately strengthening the security of web applications.The application of this insights can help in your application security program and vulnerability management.

More details

Owasp top 10 has been a pillar over the years; sister to CWE – Common Weakness Enumeration we provide an overview of the top software vulnerabilities and web application security risks with a data-driven approach focused on helping identify what risk to fix first.
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Chris Romeo is a leading voice and thinker in application security, threat modeling, and security champions and the CEO of Devici and General Partner at Kerr Ventures. Chris hosts the award-winning “Application Security Podcast,” “The Security Table,” and “The Threat Modeling Podcast” and is a highly rated industry speaker and trainer, featured at the RSA Conference, the AppSec Village @ DefCon, OWASP Global AppSec, ISC2 Security Congress, InfoSec World and All Day DevOps. Chris founded Security Journey, a security education company, leading to an exit in 2022. Chris was the Chief Security Advocate at Cisco, spreading security knowledge through education and champion programs. Chris has twenty-six years of security experience, holding positions across the gamut, including application security, security engineering, incident response, and various Executive roles. Chris holds the CISSP and CSSLP certifications.

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Jim Manico is the founder of Manicode Security, where he trains software developers on secure coding and security engineering. Jim is also the founder of Brakeman Security, Inc. and an investor/advisor for Signal Sciences. He is the author of Iron-Clad Java: Building Secure Web Applications (McGraw-Hill), a frequent speaker on secure software practices, and a member of the JavaOne Rockstar speaker community. Jim is also a volunteer for and former board member of the OWASP foundation.

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